US Immigration Laws 1900's

www.emmigration.info   

 

   Home

Emmigration Aircraft

US Immigration Laws 1900's
This article lists the date, definition and a summary of US Immigration Laws of the 1900's and 2000's. Major events in history impacted US policies and laws that were passed during this period. One of the first historical events to impact US Immigration Laws 1900's was in 1910 when the Angel Island Immigration Station opened where immigrants from China, Japan and Asia were inspected before entry was allowed into the United States.

The Ellis Island Immigration Station had been opened earlier in 1892. Migrants from the east and the west were now subject to inspection in the 1900's. Another event in US history had a massive impact on the immigration policies and laws of the United States in the 1900's - the Dillingham Commission. The 1911 Dillingham Commission report concluded that southern and eastern European migrants consisted of inferior, uneducated and unskilled workers who failed to integrate with Americans and posed a serious threat to American society. The Dillingham Commission recommended that their numbers should be greatly reduced and US Immigration Laws in the 1900's were effected. WW1 and WW2 led to labor shortages in the US, as many of Americans were drafted into the military. The United States used migrants to replenish its labor force and established temporary initiatives like the 1943 Bracero Program. The US became embroiled in the war against Communism which led to the Korean War and the Vietnam War and Immigration laws in the 1900's were passed in the aftermath of these conflicts and to combat the subsequent humanitarian crisis of refugees. The 21st century brought a new threat to the nation - Terrorism. US Immigration Laws in the 2000's were passed to combat terrorism. For additional laws, facts, history and information refer to US Immigration Laws 1800's.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1903 Immigration Act (Anarchist Exclusion Act)
The Immigration Act of 1903 aka the Anarchist Exclusion Act followed the assassination of President McKinley in 1901 by the anarchist Leon Czolgosz. The Anarchist Exclusion Act prohibited the entry of people judged to be anarchists and political extremists. This was the first of the US Immigration Laws passed in the 1900's.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1906 Naturalization Act
The Naturalization Act of 1906 established the Bureau of Immigration and Naturalization in the Commerce Department to standardize naturalization procedures. The law also required that some knowledge of the English language was a requirement for American citizenship.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1907 Immigration Act
The Immigration Act of 1907 was part of a series of reforms aimed at further restricting the increasing number of immigrants. The Dillingham Commission was formed as a result of the law in response to growing political concern about the effects of immigration in the United States. The subsequent Dillingham Commission report discriminated between Old and New Immigration and concluded that migration of southern and eastern Europeans posed a serious threat to American society and culture. The Dillingham Commission report led to further stringent and specific immigration restrictions.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1917 Immigration Act (Barred Zone Act)
The Immigration Act of 1917 (aka the Barred Zone Act) restricted immigration barring all laborers from Eastern Asia, except for Japan and the Philippines, by creating an "Asiatic Barred Zone". The law also introduced a literacy test for all immigrants over 14 years of age.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1918 Immigration Act (Dillingham-Hardwick Act)
The Immigration Act of 1918 expanded the provisions of the 1903 Anarchist Exclusion Act to anti-war protesters and members of radical labor unions and to increase powers to detain and remove foreign-born anarchists. The "Red Scare" of left-wing Communism led to arrests and deportations.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1921 Emergency Quota Act
The 1921 Emergency quota act was the first quota to be enforced for all nationalities. The Emergency Quota Act used  percentage system to establish limits and restrict the number of immigrants from a given country. The quota was 3% of the number of residents from that same country already living in the United States. The quotas were based on the 1910 U.S. Census and the law was an attempt by the government to maintain the United States Northern European cultural profile. The quotas ensured that the level of permitted immigration from a certain nationality corresponded to the population of that nationality living in the United States in 1910.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1922 Married Woman's Act (Cable Act)
The Married Woman's Act, aka the Cable Act, stated that any female US Citizen who married an alien ineligible for citizenship would then lose her own citizenship

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1924 Immigration Act of 1924 (Johnson-Reed Act)
The Immigration Act of 1924, or Johnson-Reed Act, addressed loopholes in the Emergency quota act restricting the number of immigrants from a given country to 2% of the number of residents from that same country living in the United States - the 'Golden Door' to America was shut. 87% of permits go to immigrants from Britain, Ireland, Germany, and Scandinavia. The law also established the Border Patrol

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1934 Tydings-McDuffie Act
The Tydings-McDuffie Act provided for independence of the Philippine Islands, and changed the status of Filipinos from American citizens to aliens.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1940 Alien Registration Act
The outbreak of WW2 led to the Alien Registration Act that required the registration and fingerprinting of all aliens in the United States over the age of 14 years old. Another objective of the law was to undermine the American Communist Party.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1943 Magnusan Act
The Magnusan Act repealed the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act. Congress also passed legislation that provided for the importation of agricultural workers from North, South, and Central America which was the basis of the temporary "Bracero Program" which addressed the nation's labor shortage caused by WW2. The temporary "Bracero Program" was to last for 22 years.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1945 War Brides and Fiancées Acts
The War Brides and Fiancées Acts were laws that allowed an estimated 1,000,000 American Soldiers to bring their foreign wives and fiancees to America.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1948 Displaced Persons Act 
The Displaced Persons Act allowed people uprooted by World War 2 to emigrate to United States.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1952 Immigration and Nationality Act (McCarran-Walter Act)
The McCarran-Walter bill reorganized the structure of immigration laws and  immigration law was organized within one body of text.  The 1952 law retained a quota system for nationalities and regions and placed great importance on labor qualifications. The law established a preference system which determined which ethnic groups were desirable immigrants to the United States.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act (Hart-Celler Act)
The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965, also known as the Hart-Celler Act, was a major landmark in U.S. immigration law abolishing nation-of-origin restrictions. The law set a maximum annual level of immigration at 300,000 visas and placed a per-country limit for immigrants from the Eastern Hemisphere at 20,000. No limits were placed on immigrants from the Western Hemisphere. 1965 also saw the end of the Bracero Program which was established in 1943.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1975 Indochina Migration and Refugee Assistance Act 
The Indochina Migration and Refugee Assistance Act. These laws allowed Vietnamese, Cambodians, and Laotians recruited by the US in the war against communism were admitted to the US as displaced citizens.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1976 and 1978 Immigration and Nationality Act Amendments
The Immigration and Nationality Act Amendments of 1976 was a major attempt by Congress to establish a rational and just immigration policy extending per-country limitations on immigration to the Western Hemisphere. Additional amendments were made to the  INA, which combined the hemisphere quotas and set a single annual world quota of 290,000 immigrants.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1980 Refugee Act
The Refugee Act of 1980 established the modern asylum system. The law allowed persecuted individuals to seek asylum in the United States. The law  defined refugees as “an individual unable or unwilling to return to his or her country based on a well-founded fear of persecution on account of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group, or political affiliation.”

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) 
The comprehensive Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) granted Legal Status to qualifying Immigrants who entered the US illegally before January 1, 1982.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1987 Amerasian Homecoming Act
The Amerasian Homecoming Act allowed children of U.S. servicemen and Vietnamese women to immigrate to the United States

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1990 Immigration Act
The Immigration Act of 1990 revised all grounds for exclusion and deportation and increased the limits on legal immigration to the United States to 700,000. The law also created the the Diversity Visa Lottery Program for citizens of countries where the U.S. did not usually grant large numbers of visas in order to increase the diversity of the immigrant flow.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1996 Anti-terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (AEDPA) 
The Anti-terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act tightened immigration to protect against terrorism following the attacks on Oklahoma City and the World Trade Center.

US Immigration Laws 1900's: The 1996 Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA)
The provisions of the AEDPA law were superseded by the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (IIRIRA) that created more stringent immigration laws relating to admission and deportation. This was the last of the US Immigration Laws passed in the 1900's

US Immigration Laws 2000's: The 2000 Bring Them Home Alive Act
The 2000 Bring Them Home Alive Act was the first of the US Immigration Laws passed in the 2000's. The law provided for the granting of refugee status in the United States for nationals of foreign countries who assisted in the return of POW/MIAs to the United States.

US Immigration Laws 2000's: The 2001 USA Patriot Act
The USA Patriot Act for "Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism" was passed to enhance law enforcement to deter and punish terrorist acts in the United States and around the world.

US Immigration Laws 2000's: The 2002 Enhanced Border Security and Visa Entry Reform Act 
The Enhanced Border Security and Visa Entry Reform Act were laws passed following the 9/11 attacks, representing the most comprehensive immigration-related response to the continuing terrorist threat America

US Immigration Laws 2000's: The 2005 REAL ID Act
The REAL ID Act expanded Laws for Asylum and Deportation of Foreigners for Terrorist Activities and established requirements for state driver's licenses and ID cards to be accepted by the federal government for "official purposes", as defined by the Secretary of Homeland Security.

US Immigration Laws 2000's: The 2006 Secure Fence Act 
The Secure Fence Act authorized fencing along the US-Mexican Border and sanctioned the use of surveillance technology.

US Immigration Laws 2000's: The 2013 Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act 
The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act provided for a temporary visa for undocumented immigrants who are the victims of domestic abuse.

List of all US Immigration Laws

DISCLAIMER: This website and any information contained herein are intended for educational and informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. Seek competent legal counsel from an Immigration lawyer for advice on any legal matter.

US Immigration Laws 1900's and 2000's for Kids, Schools and Homework

  • Interesting, fun facts about US Immigration Laws in the 1900'sand how they effected migrants to America for kids and schools
  • Facts about US Immigration Laws of the 1900's - dates and description and summary of acts and laws
  • Interesting facts about United States Immigration Laws of the 1900's together with descriptions, definition, summary and dates
  • Facts, definition, summary and information of US Immigration Laws 1900's
  • Fast, fun facts about US Immigration Laws and legislation 1900's with a summary and definition of the laws passed by Congress
  • Interesting US Immigration Laws of the 1900's and laws and policies that shaped U.S. emigration and the lives of migrants
  • Interesting US Emigration Laws 1900's with facts, laws and history for schools, homework projects, kids and children

US Immigration Laws 1900's - US Policies and Laws - Dates of Laws - Description of Laws - US Immigration Laws 1900's - History of Laws - US Immigration Laws 1900's - Migration - Immigration Acts and Laws of the 1800's - Emigration Laws - US Immigration Laws 1900's - US Policies and Laws - Laws and Dates - US - United States - American - Kids - Schools - Homework - Laws - Dates - Summary - Definition - Facts about US Policies and Laws - History of Immigration Laws 1900's - Info about US Immigration Laws 1900's - Information on Immigration Laws - US Policies and Laws - Dates of Laws - US Immigration Laws - US Immigration Laws 1900's

Siteseen Ltd © 2017
Cookie Policy By Linda Alchin Privacy Statement