US Immigration Laws Timeline

Emmigration

US Immigration Laws Timeline
This article provides a comprehensive US Immigration Laws Timeline with a record of important legislation in the order of their occurrence. The US Immigration Laws Timeline details fast facts and information about famous legislation in the history of the United States. Find the sequence of these historical events, arranged in chronological order.

The US Immigration Laws Timeline provides facts and dates of events that precipitated a significant change in government policy on immigration and had a profound effect on the lives of migrants. The dates in the US Immigration Laws Timeline coincide with times of crisis, evolution and great change in the history of the United States. Specific information via the US Immigration Laws Timeline can be seen at a glance with concise and accurate dates of legislation.

  

US Immigration Laws Timeline 1700's: History and Facts for kids

1789: Under the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Congress has complete authority over immigration. The first laws in the US Immigration Laws Timeline are the Alien and Sedition Acts.

1790: 1790, 1795 and 1798 the Naturalization Acts were passed establishing a uniform rule of naturalization

1798: The 1798 Alien Friends Act authorized the president to imprison or deport aliens

1798: The 1798 Alien Enemies Act authorized the president to expel citizen of a hostile nation, during times of war

1789: Under the U.S. Constitution, the U.S. Congress has complete authority over immigration. The first laws in the xx are the Alien and Sedition Acts.

US Immigration Laws Timeline 1800's

1802: The 1802 Naturalization Law required the entry of all aliens to be recorded and reinstated the 5 year citizenship requirement

1819: The 1819 Immigration Act required ship captains to provide documentation about all passengers and immigrants

1848: The 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo granted U.S. citizenship to Mexicans living in the territory ceded by Mexico to the United States.

1875: The 1875 Page Act was the first restrictive immigration law prohibiting the entry of immigrants considered "undesirable".

1882: The Chinese Exclusion Act barred the immigration of unskilled laborers from China for a time period of ten years

1882: The Immigration Act of 1882 restricted European immigrants from Europe, provided categories of immigrants ineligible for entry into the US and imposed a 'head tax' of 50 cents on all immigrants landing at US ports

1885: The Alien Contract Labor Law prohibited anyone from bringing unskilled laborers into the United States under contract to work for them.

1886: The Statue of Liberty was dedicated in New York Harbor, the landmark for all European immigrants

1890: Control of immigration was assumed by the Federal Government.

1891: The 1891 Immigration Act provided for the regulation of immigration and the inspection and deportation of immigrants.

1892: The 1892 Geary Act extended the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, restricting immigration from China for another 10 years

1892: The Ellis Island immigration center was opened where immigrants from Europe were subjected to medical and legal examinations

US Immigration Laws Timeline 1900's

1903: The 1901 assassination of President McKinley by the anarchist Leon Czolgosz prompted Congress to pass the Anarchist Exclusion Act banning anarchists and political extremists.

1906: The Naturalization Act of 1906 standardized naturalization process and required some English language for US citizenship.

1907: The 1907 Immigration Act consisted of a series of reforms to restrict the number of immigrants and established the Dillingham Commission whose report led to further stringent and specific immigration restrictions.

1910: The Angel Island Immigration Station was opened on the east in California to regulate Asian immigration.

1915: US Congress Authorized "Mounted Inspectors" along the US-Mexico Border

1917: The 1971 Immigration Act (commonly known as the Barred Zone Act) restricted immigration from Eastern Asiaby creating an "Asiatic Barred Zone".

1921: The 1921 Emergency Quota Act used of quota system to restrict the number of immigrants from a given country (3% of the number of residents from that same country living in the US based on the 1910 U.S. Census)

1922: The 1922 Married Woman's Act, aka the Cable Act, stated that any female US Citizen who married an alien ineligible for citizenship would then lose her own citizenship

1924: The Border Patrol and Border stations were established to formally admit Mexican workers

1924: The Immigration Act of 1924 (Johnson-Reed Act) restricting the number of immigrants from a given country to 2% of the number of residents from that same country living in the US. 87% of permits went to immigrants from Britain, Ireland, Germany, and Scandinavia

1934: Following Philippine independence the 1934 Tydings-McDuffie Act changed the status of Filipinos from American citizens to aliens

1940: The 1940 Alien Registration Act required the registration and fingerprinting of all aliens in the United States over the age of 14.

1943: The 1943 Magnusan Act repealed the Chinese Exclusion Acts.

1943: The Bracero Program brought 5,000,000 temporary Mexican Laborers to work in US

1945: The War Brides and Fiancées Acts allowed American Soldiers to bring their foreign spouses to America.

1948: The Displaced Persons Act allowed people uprooted by World War 2 to immigrate to the US

1952: The 1952 McCarran-Walter bill re-structured the US immigration laws.

1965: The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 (Hart-Celler Law) abolished nation-of-origin restrictions

1975: The Indochina Migration and Refugee Assistance Act allowed allies in the war against to be admitted to as displaced citizens

1980: The Refugee Act of 1980 allowed persecuted Individuals to seek asylum in the US

1986: The Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) granted Legal Status to qualifying Immigrants who entered the US illegally before January 1, 1982

1987: The Amerasian Homecoming Act allowed children of U.S. servicemen and Vietnamese women to immigrate to the US

1990: The Immigration Act of 1990 revised grounds for exclusion and deportation and increased the limits on legal immigration to the US

1996: Anti-terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act (AEDPA) tightened immigration to protect the homeland against terrorism following the attacks on Oklahoma City and the World Trade Center

1996: The AEDPA law were superseded by the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act (IIRIRA) that created more stringent immigration laws relating to admission and deportation.

US Immigration Laws Timeline 2000's

2000: The 2000 Bring Them Home Alive Act granted refugee status for nationals of foreign countries who assisted in the return of POW/MIAs to the United States.

2002: The Enhanced Border Security and Visa Entry Reform Act were laws passed following the 9/11 attacks, representing the most comprehensive immigration-related response to the continuing terrorist threat America

2005: The REAL ID Act expanded laws for Asylum and Deportation of foreigners for terrorist activity

2006: The Secure Fence Act authorizing fencing along the US-Mexican Border and authorized the use of surveillance technology

2013: Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act provided for a temporary visa for undocumented immigrants who are the victims of domestic abuse

US Immigration Laws Timeline: History and Facts for kids

US Immigration Laws Timeline
The above history timeline provides details via the US Immigration Laws Timeline with dates of important legislation in United States. The US Immigration Laws Timeline provides interesting facts about important immigration legislation in the history of the United States. Find the sequence of these historical events, arranged in chronological order in the US Immigration Laws Timeline. The US Immigration Laws Timeline provides dates of historical events that precipitated a significant change in government immigration policy. The dates in the US Immigration Laws Timeline coincide with times of crisis and wars in the history of the United States. Specific information via the US Immigration Laws Timeline can be seen at a glance with concise and accurate dates of legislation, an ideal educational resource.

DISCLAIMER: This website and any information contained herein are intended for educational and informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. Seek competent legal counsel from an Immigration lawyer for advice on any legal matter.

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